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ZWO 1.25" H-Alpha 7nm Narrowband Filter Mark II

ZWO 1.25'' H-Alpha 7nm Narrowband Filter Mark II
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Price:  £134.00(Inc. 20% VAT)
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Model:  Z257-Ha7nm1.25MkII
Brand:  ZWO

Availability  

  

Generally In Stock, Please Confirm Before Ordering



2 Year Warranty On All New Items
(Excluding Batteries & Globes)



Narrowband filters are used to create high contrast deep sky images of certain objects, mainly emission and diffuse nebulae (i.e. Veil Nebula, M42 Orion Nebula, North America Nebula, Horsehead Nebula) or planetary nebulae (i.e. M27 Dumbbell nebula, M57 Ring Nebula, Helix Nebula), just to mention few of well known nebulosities. Narroband filters are sometimes used instead of LRGB filter sets and sometimes in combination with them...However, if you don't yet want to commit to full narrowband H-S-O imaging, it could be a good start to add just a H-alpha filter to your collection of LRGB filters or you might even use it just on its own as we'll explain below...

Some amateur astronomers would use a H-alpha filter when the Moon is out or if they live in heavily light polluted areas as these filters would practically eliminate the effects of light pollution as a side effect. By applying longer exposure time you will increase the brightness of the nebulosity whilst stars will still apear much fainter (thus smaller and sharper) than if they were imaged with LRGB filters. The sky's background will also stay darker hence contrast will be increased. Many amateurs would use a H-alpha filter in combination with an LRGB set for certain objects, mainly nebulosities.

Others would use a H-alpha filter with a colour camera. Although it might seem counter productive, but it is a good compromise when you don't want to spend lots of time with post processing, but sometimes you need that extra narrowband data for a deep sky object... best to use it with fast imaging telescopes with f/8 and faster focal ratio.

Technical Specifications of ZWO H-alpha Narrowband Filter
Size: 1.25″
Fine-optically polished to ensure accurate 1/4 wavefront over both surfaces
FWHM:7 0.5nm
Thickness of glass: 1.9mm 0.03mm
Total Thickness: 9mm = 5.5mm + 3.5mm (thread)
Optical Length: 5.5mm
Thread: M28.5*0.6 male thread (standard 1.25" filter thread)

The ZWO H-Alpha filter has a bandpass of 7nm and passes light at 656nm wavelength. The light transmission rate comes up to appr. 90% (min 80%). A 7nm type is a very good choice for narrowband H-alpha astrophotography for high-contrast imaging and revealing rich details of a nebula even in areas with strong light pollution, so prepare to have lots of fun with it !

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Some items that are showing as in stock are in stock at our holding warehouses, not at the shop. To double check the stock levels at the shop, please contact us on 01909774369 or sales@rothervalleyoptics.co.uk.

The delivery times for most items is 1 - 2 days but again, please double check stock levels on important orders before placing an order via the website.

The delivery costs for courier next day are for mainland UK only. If you live in the Scottish Highlands/Islands, Channel Islands or Northern Ireland, then a shipping surchage will apply. please contact us for prices. Smaller items can still go 1st class via Royal Mail.

Please note that if you are wanting to take advantage of our Saturday and Sunday timed services or next day pre 12 or pre 10:30 services, you MUST check that the stock is here at the shop before placing orders. Also, orders using the Saturday and Sunday services must be placed before 1pm the previous working day. Also, please remember to check that the stock is here at the shop before placing orders. If the stock is not at the shop, we won't be able to ship on any of the timed services. 

Please note International customers will need to contact us for a shipping price prior to ordering via the website. We don't ship all items internationally. It is at our discretion what we ship outside of the UK. This all depends on the size and weight of the items. Please get in touch with us for any postage costs. Please note we do NOT ship telescopes or heavy items outside of the UK. This is due to massive postage costs and problems regarding returns.

If you have any questions regarding stock levels or delivery, please get in touch.

Zygo Interferometer Testing For ED Refractor Telescopes!

We are extremely pleased to announce our Zygo Interferometer is now installed and ready for use! Our experienced staff can test refractor lenses up to 120mm aperture and provide a comprehensive 2 page report showing the optical quality and Strehl ratio, plus much more information. We are using the very latest Zygo MX software to provide a more detailed report compared to other standard reports.

 

The interferometer is essentially a measuring instrument. Within the interferometer is a calibrated laser that is pointed through the optical test surface, then onto a high quality reference sphere, then back through the test subject then to an internal camera which gives us the measurement on the screen. From this, we can adjust the position of the test optic and the reference sphere to obtain a perfectly calibrated system. The more central the laser to the test optic and then on return, the better and more accurate reading and measurement we can take. This takes a lot of adjustment to get the best results from the optical surface. Once the measurement has been taken, we are provided with a series of results that show the optical quality of the surface plus other information. Continue reading for an explanation of the individual values and you can also see a test report that was done on one of our RVO Horizon 60 OTAs. 

We are offering certain telescopes with a Zygo test at an extra cost. Mainly ED doublets and triplets. All available telescopes with a Zygo test report are listed here. Just select Zygo Test Report from the drop down box at the top of the listing and we will test the optics in house and provide a full 2 page report with your scope. This will show you the optical quality of your telescope optics. We can also offer this service on your refractor telescope. Please get in touch for more details about this. 

At Rother Valley Optics, one thing we pride ourselves on is customer service and quality of our equipment. When we test your telescope, we will ensure that it is of the highest quality otherwise, we will reject the scope under our strict quality control and test another model for your peace of mind. One of the main values to look at when testing a refractor is the Strehl ratio. The higher this number, the higher quality lens you have. At Rother Valley Optics, we will guarantee the highest possible Strehl ratio for your telescope.  We will aim to provide 0.95 Strehl or higher on Takahashi, RVO Horizon, William Optics and many more! Generally, the higher the Strehl ratio, the lower the Astigmatism and Coma meaning a better image quality from your instrument. 

Other measurements such as the PV and RMS are important too. With these measurements, the lower the number the better as it shows less curvature on the lens. The flatter an optical lens, the better it will perform. The PV rating (Peak To Valley) is a measurement from the highest point (Peak) to the lowest point (Valley). From this we get the RMS (Root, Mean, Square). This is a similar figure to the PV and measured exactly the same way. The RMS is basically an average height difference from the PV so again, the lower the better. As you can see form the example below, we measured an RMS of just 0.027 wave which is a very good value.

We also measure the Power with our systems which is essentially the error from the reference sphere to the test optic. The reference sphere we use on our system is a very high quality sphere so the closer to zero the Power, the less error between the 2 elements thus ensuring a higher quality optical surface. 

You will also see some more values such as Astigmatism and Coma. Again, these are measured by the interferometer when we take measurements of the optical surface after adjustment. These are values which ideally would be at 0 but as our test optics are all curved lenses, there will always be astigmatism and coma present. The lower the number, the less of these aberations you will effectively see but with most refractors, you can buy field flatteners which will compensate for the coma anyway. The astigmatisms value is explaining the error between the symmetrical curvature of the lens. Basically, no lens will be perfectly symmetrical, the lower the astigmatism, the more symmetrical the lens surface is. 

Once the Zygo test report has been completed, the optical alignment is thoroughly tested and tuned to ensure they are spot on before they leave us. 

All available telescopes are on the website at the link below and ones we've tested already that are available straight away are also listed.

https://www.rothervalleyoptics.co.uk/zygo-tested-refractors.html

Here is an example of the test what we provide. This was a test on one of our Horizon 60 ED OTA's.

For any questions about this amazing new service, please either call 01909774369 or email sales@rothervalleyoptics.co.uk.

 


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